#DemandTheSupply of products made with conflict-free minerals from Congo

Conflict minerals have fueled and continue to help sustain the world’s deadliest conflict since World War II, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. These minerals – tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold – are valuable on the international market because they are used in products ranging from cell phones to jewelry to cars to kitchen appliances. This also has made them a lucrative source of funding for deadly armed groups in Congo who take control of mining areas through violence, committing serious abuses including sexual violence and the recruitment of child soldiers.

Years of pressure from Congolese civil society and international consumers, legislative action, and corporate leadership have slowly begun to turn the tide in Congo’s 3TG mining in positive directions. Parts of the mining sector are beginning to formalize, improving security in some areas and offering economic benefits to miners and their communities.

Enough’s 2017 rankings assess top-selling companies in the consumer electronics and jewelry retail industries in order to celebrate advances made since Enough conducted its first company rankings in 2010, and expose the considerable and urgent need for improvement.

This Black Friday, join the Enough Project and Stop Genocide Now to #DemandtheSupply of products made with conflict-free minerals from Congo 

TAKE ACTION:

Join the Thunderclap to share the message! The #DemandtheSupply Thunderclap will launch on Black Friday, the largest consumer holiday in the U.S., to get the attention of companies Enough ranked and send them an important message: their customers want products that are manufactured with conflict-free minerals from Congo, made by companies with conflict-free supply chains.

Share the campaign leading up to Black Friday by using Enough’s #DemandtheSupply Social Media Kit.

Stop Genocide Now

Stop Genocide Now (SGN) seeks to change the way the world responds to genocide by putting a face to the numbers of dead, dying, and displaced.

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