Permanency

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IMG_5744.jpg We traveled today from Abeche to Guereda on a small humanitarian aid plane piloted by two South Africans. The one giving the security overview had quite a sense of humor and after almost every precaution would chuckle and say, “hope we don’t need that.”

Once in Guereda we were able to connect to a wifi and receive a cell signal. Last time we were here, almost a year and a half ago, neither of these were available. Overall, here in Guereda, as well as Abeche and Goz Beida, the humanitarian operations are more and more a permanent fixture in the community. More buildings, more amentities for workers, more compounds with the typical barb wire and more humanitarian vehicles.

IMG_5672.JPG On one side, this may mean that the refugees feel the affects of a more committed staff who can better help serve them. On the other side the feeling of permancy makes my heart sink further. This is not a temporary operation as of right now. There is no telling how long the refugee and IDP camps will remain in E. Chad.

Tomorrow morning we head to Camp Kounoungo. I am so excited. I haven’t been since my very first i-ACT trip (this is the 5th!) in January 2008. I am so grateful that our team has the opportunity to go to the different camps. The difference in people and culture is challenging and inspiring.

I am hoping that we will get to see all the old friends: Ahmat, Adam, Yacoub, and Fatne. We will be posting a few more days of i-ACT even though this is day 10 – so stay tuned and be reunited with old friends just as we will be!

paz, ktj

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