More on Abeche

Tomorrow, we will show you life in Abeche. This city has grown tremendously due to the influx of NGO’s coming to work with the Darfur refugees. The hope of employment here brings people from all over Chad to this town in the sand.

Among these job seekers, we found Akaye, our translator. He will travel with us to the camps. He speaks French, Arabic, and English. His English, he picked up while studying in Gana; he had to stop studying when his brother, who was supporting his studies, came into difficult financial times. I’m sure you’ll get to see Akaye soon.

We also have a car and driver now, so the i-ACT team on the ground has doubled in size overnight!

We decided to stay in Abeche one extra day, so we could meet with some NGO officials and buy provisions for out trip north. There is nowhere to buy food or water once we leave Abeche. We also wanted to show you Abeche, which will come in Day 4.

Paz

NOTE: THIS ENTRY IS POSTED ON BEHALF OF GABRIEL

Gabriel co-founded Stop Genocide Now in 2005, which gave birth to i-ACT in 2009.

He became involved in the situation in Darfur out of a sense of personal responsibility. He believes the power of community and compassion, combined with personal empowerment, can bring about meaningful change.

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Category: Day 3: Nov 23, 2005 · Tags: , , ,

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