Reason #57: Think Global, Act Local

We are lucky that we get to visit the camps in person. It is such a
privilage to be part of their community. James, G, and I got into a
groove here in Camp Djabal. We started to recognize more and more
faces each day, and the women of Darfur would come up to us and shake
our hands and ask for their picture to be taken rather than shying
away.

It was our last day in this camp and as I reflect on how this trip was
different from previous, the word Hope comes back to me more and more.
There is still hope to return back to Darfur. And there always will
be. But more and more the young ones and those who speak English tell
me they want to go to America. There is even a UNHCR resettlement
officer here now.

The shift from returning home, which was once all that they talked
about, to the desire to go elsewhere, where there is peace, makes my
heart ache. I feel like I failed, we failed at preserving and
protecting their way of life, and facilitating peace in their
homeland. Maybe it’s presumptuous to think I can make a difference,
but I’m glad to say that the desire to at least try is pretty
ingrained in my nature. So I won’t give up.

If I have learned anything in the years and years of advocacy, action,
outreach, and education it is that we must act for our entire global
community, even if small steps. That no step is really too small to
make a big impact. “Think Global, Act Local” is not just a
bumper-sticker or a slogan to buy fair trade rice, it’s an opportunity
to make a big difference in the lives of others living far away by
doing something small here and today. Please take the action below.

peace, ktj

Katie-Jay keeps i-ACT running on several levels. Much of her work entails coordinating partnerships with other grassroots organizations and implementing the campaigns developed by Gabriel and seeing through the details. She graduated from Portland State University with a BA in Sociology and a focus on Community Development. She has previously worked as a community organizer in Thailand, Guatemala, and with grassroots organizations across the United States.

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