Pictures from today

James Thacher

James is i-ACT’s web and graphic designer and main video editor. As a full-time staff member, he also does a little bit of everything to keep all the projects running.

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Category: Day 10: April 2 · Tags:

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One Response to “Pictures from today”
  1. I want to say something. I am tired. And it is late and should be in bed….but I must try to say something. I stayed up all night last night working on a Youtube re Darfur. I don’t know how to do this kind of work…I am a novice, so I struggle through the night trying to figure it out. Not like Yuen-Lin. The master of such things.

    I just read Dajhima’s story and watched the slideshow…truly breath-taking to think about.

    In a day of wi-fi, the Darfuri people have so little. Just makes you humble. I have been posting about your work on my blog, but I am behind. I will catch up. I started my most recent post this way:

    Tuesday, March 31, 2009
    HOW WOULD YOU DO LIVING IN A REFUGEE CAMP?

    DARFURI FAMILIES WITHOUT THEIR HOMES FOR SIX YEARS

    Imagine being without electricity. When the electricity goes off for a few hours, it feels like an inconvenience. I reach for the light switch and remember there is no point.

    Imagine being without food. Sunday I tried not to eat as a part of solidarity with the Darfuri people. And just because I felt like I couldn’t go and get even a cookie, it brought an awareness of what it has to be like for the Darfuris who live day in and day out without the luxury to go to the cupboard or a refrigerator to grab something to answer the need to eat something.

    Imagine being without water. No shower. No hand washing. No washing the clothes. Dishes. No water to drink.

    Imagine being without plumbing. This would be the worst. No bathroom. It is such a convenience. Just to have your own bathroom. A toilet. Imagine not having a toilet. Ever.

    Imagine having nothing.

    Imagine not having a pharmacy to go to. Imagine not having a doctor to take your sick child to.

    Imagine watching your child dying. Slowly.

    Imagine no computers, no TV, no car.

    It is hard to imagine.

    Darfuri families don’t have to imagine. They live it.

    http://ilovemylifebrothersandsisters.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-would-you-do-living-in-refugee-camp.html

    Thank you for bringing me closer to the reality of what it is like to be there.

    It also humbles me.

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