Generations of Darfur

by katie-jay scott
3 april 2009

dirty clothes
with holes that expose
malnourished tummys
and our failure as humanity

common colds
cracked skin and bumps
ordinary for children everywhere
possibly deadly for those here

animal feces, garbage, dead carcasses
sprawl the camp paths
only a few of many
lucky enough to wear shoes

families grow
animals acquired
food rations, water supplies
remain at constant short fall

Marymouda fell ill
medicine and aid too late or too little
the second child of
Adef and Achta lost

perhaps not forgotten
but hope diminishing
peace for Darfur
further away for the widowed

generations of knowledge
replaced with dependence
farming to hand outs
sustainable to bare minimum

everyone wants to dream
for hopes to soar and
realities to exceed
expectations of status quo

for the mother of seven
with only a tent and
an empty cooking pot
hopes may remain only dreams

i dream
for a world without hate
where people are free
to create their way forward

to be who they are
with no negative consequence
no fear of harm
for their choices to be

Darfurians targeted
for murder, rape, their end
those who survived the flames
memories of hatred remain

life will never be the same
intergenerational genocide
loss of culture, traditions
stories of elders reduced to ashes

to begin to return
peace comes with justice
leads to renewed hopes
and a possible future

for rebuilding the homes
cultivating the land
educating the youth
raising expectations

we cannot change what past
we can support
the next generation of a
stronger Darfur returned

Katie-Jay keeps i-ACT running on several levels. Much of her work entails coordinating partnerships with other grassroots organizations and implementing the campaigns developed by Gabriel and seeing through the details. She graduated from Portland State University with a BA in Sociology and a focus on Community Development. She has previously worked as a community organizer in Thailand, Guatemala, and with grassroots organizations across the United States.

Comments

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Comments

14 Responses to “Generations of Darfur”
  1. carole says:

    ah, katie, i so love you and all the others who go and try to help.

    carole

  2. Rob Hadley says:

    Well done KTJ! I will share this with my students:) Btw…I have over 200 signed up for my Genocide Course next year!! Thanks for all the work you are doing…I remain hopeful that we can push this agenda up the priority list with persistant action. Keep it up:)
    Rob

    • Katie-Jay says:

      Hi Rob! It’s so good to hear from you. Please feel free to share the poem far and wide. And the videos too. They may feel connected with seeing the kids drumming and dancing. I hope we can push Darfur up the agenda list, too. We must keep the pressure on. For your course this coming term, it would be very cool for you all to take weekly actions, in the beginning you could provide them with actions, and towards the end, the students could contribute to coming up with them
      peace, ktj

  3. Lisa Goldner says:

    What a moving poem, KTJ! With your permission, I’ll add it to the anthology of poetry we’re compiling, dedicated to the Darfurians, with anti-genocide themes and hope for peace. Several of the Darfuri children, here, are keeping journals, writing their stories for speeches they want to make on Darfur, making scrapbooks, and composing songs about their lives and their dreams for the future. Your poetry is sure to inspire them. Thank you for sharing.

    Peace,

    Lisa

  4. Kathleen says:

    You have always written from your heart to express all of our hearts. I am proud of you and still learn from you every day.
    Love,
    Your Mom

  5. Peggy says:

    Your poem obviously emanates from the bottom of your beautiful heart, KTJ. No wonder your Mom is so proud! You are an insipiration to all of us.

  6. Isaac Murphy says:

    Whew…

    KTJ,

    I, too, dream of this world you speak of, where we receive as our birthright the opportunity to grow, and thrive. And I, too, acknowledge that we have to begin where we are now, that what’s past is past, now waiting to be healed in the present. As for the failure of humanity, yes, look what we’ve have allowed to happen with our complacency, our consent through non-action…. but it’s not everyone purposefully ignoring the unimaginable injustices, not everyone closing their hearts to the pain and suffering we collectively ignore. Don’t forget to include yourself in this human race, and surely, though the results you see may not be complete as you bear witness to the darkness, you have not failed to try, to dedicate yourself completely to the defense of those in need… Please remember that you are at the tip of the spear of many who do indeed care, that you stand at the helm of a growing network of folks pushing for a different future, one we can live with.

    And I know that you know all of this… I know that you know…. I’m just wanting to respond somehow.

    Much Love to you KTJ,

    Your Cuz,

    Isaac

    • Katie-Jay says:

      Thanks Cuz.
      I have had a hard time re-adjusting this trip back home and your words are encouraging me to keep focused and keep going.
      see you in June!
      peace, ktj

  7. heid says:

    I just finished watching your visit in June and for World Refugee Day and have ben touched by your humanity. This poem is hearbreaking, but hopeful. SO powerful.

  8. Hassan says:

    Thanks Katie Scott
    It’s really amazing and superb poem, whish us a readers we can understand it word by word! toward make it applicable on our Darfurian communities and whole the world for peace keeping.

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