Impossible?

One of many lessons learned from current events is that the impossible IS possible. When people take on personal responsibility for the wellbeing of their brothers and sisters and do their part, big or small, towards positive change, “everything is possible” is no longer a corny slogan. The impossible becomes possible.

In Egypt, we’re seeing the power of sisterhood and brotherhood across all previously impenetrable lines. Doctors are standing up for taxi drivers. Laborers are standing up for lawyers. Muslims are standing up for Christians. Rich are standing up for poor. People are standing up for people.

They risk it all. We see the bloody heads and the tearful eyes. But they keep coming out. Many stand up and give their lives. On our side of the world, we risk so little, but we’re still able to contribute greatly — if we take on the personal responsibility for the wellbeing of our brothers and sisters, even if they are far and different than us.IMG_5695.JPG

I wake up every morning and read through my google feed on Darfur news, wondering how many more children were killed, starved, or raped the day before. I think of the kids in the camps that we know and wonder how they are doing. How is Guisma? How is Abdelmouni? Their little brother, Gibril?

Is peace in Darfur possible? I keep hearing that it’s complicated, and we cannot ask for unattainable goals. Everything is possible, if we each do our part. We don’t have to go out to the city’s square and risk being stabbed, stoned, or shot. But we do have to expect more from our leaders and take the time to let them know that they won’t be our leaders, if they do not represent our values.

It’s on us, on each one of us, to take that step and stand with those that need the support. I assure you that you’ll find out that the gains from venturing out with your brothers and sisters far outweigh the risks, and your world opens up to so many possibilities.

Gabriel co-founded Stop Genocide Now in 2005, which gave birth to i-ACT in 2009.

He became involved in the situation in Darfur out of a sense of personal responsibility. He believes the power of community and compassion, combined with personal empowerment, can bring about meaningful change.

Comments

comments

Category: SGN Blog · Tags:

Leave A Comment



c